People & Blogs 

Agile Planning Pt 2 – Eating the Onion from the Inside Out

$23.20

Agile Software Development with Scrum (Series in Agile Software Development)

From Amazon

Sales Rank 50542 Schwaber, Ken/ Beedle, Mike

eXtreme Programming is an ideal many software shops would love…
Buy now

Language:
all right in this segment it's agileplanning part 2 and the first segment Ikind of went through how we really breakit down what are those time frames whatdo we call those time frames what wemight call the bodies work within thosetime frames and how we mapped how wemove things through their respectivestates within that time frame and whatthose expectations of delivery might beagainst those states I didn't get intothat a great deal other than sayingwe're going from and I do your throughvarious ways of confirming whether theidea is the right idea or not and isthis the right way to execute against itand all the way down into actuallyexecuting against it so when we talkabout planning again where do you seeyourself in the next five years misterdo you have a plan for your lifeI recommend plastics oh no that's that'sprobably viable once again any way sothis is the agile planning onion this isa better representation in the firstvideo well note that it's a little bitbold you down at the bottom and that'sbecause I didn't want my markers tobleed over onto each other basicallynormally represented is that base rightthere all all stems from the base ofdaily activity talk about not in theprevious and those three base statesdefined do being done I've mapped thoseStates back out over here at each levelof what we're delivering because it'sgoing to be kind of important in how wemove through our planning phases mandown here I've also got this other kindof representation of how we put steeringin place how we're ensuring that we aredelivering the right thing at the righttime so when we consider that planninghas to take place in advance of activitywhat is the horizon of planning that wewant to be paying attention to when wetalk about daily planning the horizon isthat day itself we don't really extendinto the next day there's no value in itbecause you don't know how the nextday's going gonna fold you all knowuntil you finish ok today because todayinforms tomorrow's state today informstomorrow's state always so all plans arefunAbell at the day-to-day level do whatyou can today tomorrow will take care ofitselftomorrow is the consideration of thispoint of sprint planning so sprintplanning has a horizon of two to fourweeks well in order to do that planningeffectively they have to do it beforeit's due in other words if I have ahorizon of planning for a two weekwindow of work I may want to start atleast a week in advance of that sohalfway through my sprint I'll probablypin that date so down here what I'mshowing is that representation of whenactivity is occurring and the cadence ontop of it right so if this is going onevery day every two to four weeks once aweek in the middle of that sequence onthat day you then do sprint planningit's a sprint plan I'll get into that sowe go up the next level I'm planning onetwo three months out let's say it'sthree months a month and a half out I'mgoing to have to plan it how do I helpmyself plan well I'm gonna help myselfplant for the two to four weeks bylistening what's been occurring over thelast few days to ensure that the primethat we can do that body of work that Iknow has been prioritized by thebusiness right so at the and the dailyis what happened yesterday what happenedyesterday informs today just like I saidtomorrow and today informs tomorrowyesterday informs today that's just theway that works it's kind of the natureof the thing so you're starting tonotice that and somewhere in the middleof the day some most most mostorganizations - at the beginning of theday stand-ups can occur any day sothat's the the planning meeting at thedaily level is called the daily standupand is a marked ceremonial time everyday that the team collects and they talkabout what they did yesterday whatthey're working on today I know are theya blocked or not that's it there's no noother things we talkedif there are problems to be dealt withthat the team can handle once themeeting is only over those who can bestwork on that problem will gather swarmon it and resolve that issue and if theycan't they will escalate to the scrummaster who will then go find whoever'sneeded to help remove that obstacles sothe daily standup once a day usually midmorning is what I've seen throughout myexperiences I've seen some afternoonsand the evening ones and when you'redispersed I've seen it doneasynchronously through variouscommunication platforms all viablethe goal is to get a status check whatdo we do yesterday where are we at todayand are there any blocks and continuingthat work so halfway through these thesprint right one week maybe nine dayswell well in week five five days outyou're gonna want to start doing theplanning now here's the thing aboutplanning planning is happening alwaysthere are ceremonies that we wrap aroundplanning to finalize what we've beendoing all of that time beforehandthere's an actual runway of work that'soccurring beforehand just like there's arunway of other things that arehappening beforehand so in two to fourweeks timeframe that product owner isnot just verifying the work as it'sbeing done and they're accepting itthey're communicating back up to thatcoordinating layer or the PMO andsoftware those who are doing thedelivery level of features right to makesure what the priorities are and whatthey need to be doing to ensure that thepriorities are broken down in such a waythat the team can consume them easilywithout without so many hardships orquestions so they're always doing thisbut halfway through the sprint now wehave the ceremony where that productowner collects everything they've beendoing and bustle into the room with therest of the team and they go okay basedon the priorities based on what we'rethink we're capable of consuming here'swhat I think we have a good expectationof accomplishing and these are thepriorities in which we need to get themdone based on the business now this iscalled a backlog so let me take a minuteand talk about backlogs so a backlog isbasically a list of items that you wantto get done and they align to anylevel of time that you're planningagainst so at the highest level at thevisionary level this is kind of what wecall the universal backlog right so inthis big backlog of activity so rightnext to this onion there is this there'sthis silo and in this silo are all theideas in the business and at the highestlevel there they're huge they're massivethey're these big bulky things and thenas you get lower they start to decomposeinto smaller pieces right and as you getlower and lower they continue but thisis the backlog now this is how you buildyour backlog right so on the one sideyou're building things there's a funnelup here see these great ideas are comingin and they're being broken down at eachlevel going through these various statesto validate whether it's worth it or notwhatever it's not worth is gettingthrown out you get out of here you're nogood nobody likes you let's bring thisidea in so all of this is occurring atvarious levels there's these ideas thatare being brought in broken down anddigested going into smaller smallerdaily consumable sizes right but thosedaily consumable sizes are figured outof every two to four week periods butthis is how it works as far as how theseideas are being consumed all right thisis one representation of it and anotherrepresentation of it as it's beingperceived in value and being ready to beconsumed by the teams so while I've gotthis going on so let's understand nowthis is starting to look a bit like arefinery stack almost in its own waybecause what I really got going on istwo different things happening withinthis column of behaviors and on the oneside is all the intake and then here'swhere we're taking it and we'reprioritizing it at its various levelsgoing up for actual consumption becausethis is now based on the priority allright once I know that something is bigonce I know how many pieces of partsthere are to do itthen I've got to organize it in theright order so that I'm doing the rightthings so here these big bulky piecesright are getting broken down intosmaller and smaller ones until they getinto real granular bits over here it'srepresented as those smaller bitsregimented in order and refined innature and prioritized according to whatwe believe is most important as italigns to any one of these any level ofvision that we might have so at thehighest level are these user storiesthat the team is then breaking offsnapping off into their own backlog andin that backlog is the prioritized listof work that they need to do there whatstory needs to go first second thirdfourth and fifth in order to fulfill theprioritization of value delivery that'sbeen asked for all right so that'sthat's what's going on grin utilisationand then prioritization sifting the topoff based on the time frame in whatyou're doing your work so if this is mysprint backlog I mean if this is mysprint backlog there's a larger backlogbehind it for delivery that's beingprioritized that lives off to the soddenand we're actually grabbing the top ofthat so this is really a series ofstacked kind of behaviors I'm going toshow you that right across the top rightnow so really what's going on is I'mjust going to use one collar of colorbecause that makes it easier we have thehighest level of the backlog which isthen being decomposed so these visionsare being decomposed and they're theirethics then we have those epics that areprioritized the top level of which arebeing decomposed into a variety offeatures and then the top level of thosefeatures are now being decomposed into abody of stories so we see how we takethe big and now we we break it downprioritize it and we're stacking in sucha way as to say this is the mostimportant vision this is the mostimportant strategic roadmap these arethe most important features ofroadmap and these are the most importantstories do these stories first now howwe do this prioritization there's avariety of different ways and each levelthere's going to be a series that of howthat works at the sprint level that'sbasically the team working incollaboration with the product owner andfacilitated by the scrum master toensure that the right order of storiesare going to be delivered to support anydependencies that might exist acrossteams which is a bad thing that we'lltalk about that and a whole other mostpart of planning but it's a whole otherthing on its own but anyway so they'rethere they're going to sit there and sayyou know this is the order in which wecan do this technically it matches yourpriorities or technically it does notmatch your priorities and we need to dothis before that we need to introducethis as well because that's an oversightthat we missed or you missed in yourresearch or whatever the case might beso they work on setting their priorityof backlog in there and that's the orderin which they're going to execute thenthey start breaking that down then thenthe experts on the team start sayingwell in order to do this story well Iknow that it's going to take me aboutthree hours of doing some DBarchitecture in order to put this inplace and another person says well youknow it's going to take me about twohours of doing some front-end code onthat to make sure that it's going torepresent it's going to representproperly for the function that we'reafter and the tester may be sittingthere going well check it out guys inorder for this to really work it's gotto go through these series of behaviorsso this is what I'm going to test for sohere's my testing this is how much timeI believe it's going to take write yourcode around this set of behaviors sothey then okay and this is how the teamcoordinates itself for that body of workwithin that sprint so they're sittingthere and they're saying that they'vegot a wow I got really close to that soI might expect a bit but the team issitting there they know what they can dothey have six hours every day that theyconsume so there's two ways of planningand one is by capacity the amount oftime I have to give and the other is byvelocity the amount of work we cansooo now the term capacity once it getsabout here starts to flip in its meaningand capacity is actually the velocity orthe throughput that's capable of thatthat organization at that level socapacity starts to sound weird one atone time it was ours as individuals downon teams and then suddenly it's actuallythe throughput or the velocity or thesustained rate of delivery that thatlevel of the organization can deliver Ohdown at this level I've got six hours togive every day so on the planning forthe Sprint part of what's going on asthe team is sitting there as theindividual contributors scrum master andproduct aren't there going I know inthis next two weeks I'm going to be outfor three days on vacation and on thishalf-day I'm going to be in training andover here I've got a big meeting that'sexternal to this whole program andproject now some will say that the sixhours an individual has that's effectivethat two hours week discount is themeetings that are useless know that twohours as part of as part of it we ashuman beings we are prone to lessactivity than more if we are efficientwe kind of structure our day in a waythat we get about two hours to gab talktake a walk whatever and those arevaluable hours we can't really underselling of that that slack it's there ifit's needed by the organizationeverybody will snap to use that twohours we're in a critical situation butthat two hours is there to ensure thatthey're then they're in a positiveenough state to interact with everyonein a way that's going is going to beproductive because we're always justdoing the work work work work work workwork work work work work work work workwork work what do you want but if I'mwork work work yeah you know I wasthinking Fred about this thing the otherday I had this problem I was having atwork and I was wondering if we connectbattle the button now it doesn't haveimmediate value no it may have long termby it but it's also self education rightyour turn this is somebody developtheir expertise in their mastery bypursuing this so it's always valuable tothe organization so that two hours iswhat I call that's that's that's thecreative time each individual takesevery day to do the work at actionthey're actually doing so there's sixhours effective in those six hours somemeetings are being scheduled that arenot effective right so you lose time tothose so you have to discount those sothat's part of keeping the organizationaccountable this is why I say you haveto count it because it's consuming yourcapacity to deliver value against thesestories in this period of time they needto know that so meaning should becounted right meetings that are notvalued delivering valuable anddelivering against this body of work soin two to four weeks we know we canconsume X story points I talked aboutthis poor velocity with so this I needto talk about this again above the dailylevel we don't use ours anymore we getinto abstract ways of talking about howwe size the body of work in my big threeI talked about how a story point meansthree things it means complexity effortnow as we go across the fibonacci scaleand this is another thing you're goingto hear a lot in planning the afterworldis the modified Fibonacci is used toshow those sizes of events remember oneis small two is not much bigger three isnot much bigger than thatfive is bigger it's either more complexthere's less known about it takes alittle more effort eight is even biggerthan that because we have larger gapsoccurring between the repeating numbersso when we get to 20 and 21 it's achoice who uses what because at thatpoint it's just it's big it's reallyfreaking big and we're gonna have tobreak it down and the goal is to geteverything to three or less when you'retalking about at the team level we wantthese stories to equal three points orless because they were easy to consumeit's a consistent chew your food 32times to your food 32 times if you chewyour food 32 times so you know that thesystem is best designed to digest thefood for max value to deliver thosenutrients back into the system chew yourfood 32 times right so if I know howmany points I can deliver consistentlyand I know how yourdelivering on the organization'saspirational values and I meanaspirational vision so well I say I cando 10 points as worker alright so downhere alright let's do thiseverybody's got six hours we're gonnasay that this team is capable of 10points all right 10 points of work onaverage those 10 points of work canequal enough I said it's it's betweenyou want to keep it you know three orless let's say the average is two andthat's five stories we're gonna deliverevery two to four weeks all right nowwhy do we why do we do planning withthings other than a direct one-to-onerelationship to time because we as humanbeings suck at precise measurement howdo I represent this actually this is agreat way of doing this if I asked youout there to not freeze frame this andjust tell me real quick happy hash markson there right here I'm gonna get aboutsix different answers if I told you thatI was six foot five and said hey howmuch do you think that way I'm gonna getanswers that are anywhere from the lowends of the 200s to the mid range of the300s I've done this in rooms repeatedlyand that's that's always been the way itreturns we're horrible at preciseestimates the classic example I like touse was you know if I've got a jar ofmarbles you know back in the day therewere these back in the corner storesorry about that back in the cornerstore and I'm just setting something uphere back at the corner store face offback at the corner store in the daybefore my day actually they would havethese little contests to bring kids andteens in and it would be a big mason jarfull of gumballs or jelly beans orwhatever they say if you can guess asclose to the precise number is in thisjaw you're gonna win the whole candy joband people would do it right and if youaveraged the responses you're going tofind that there's a mean response or amean estimate everybody comes up withbut that's notindicative of much really because it'snot it's not it's not going to be anestimate of what's in there what you canwhat you can honestly say is that it's alot and if you compare it to somethingelse it may not be as much as that thingso if I hold this up right and I ask youhow many pens do you think this thingcould possibly hold not how many are init but how do you think how many do youthink it's possibly hold I'm gonna get avariety of answers but if I if I say isthis bigger than this everybody's gonnago no all right so this is larger thanthis everybody's gonna go yes okay sogreat so if I add something else intothe equation can I say that this isroughly the same size as that yeah greatso these two things go together we'rereally good at that so in most agileexplanations of this what you get isover dogs right so we think about interms of relative sizing we can say it'st-shirts that's the other common one youknow it's extra-large it's large itssmall its medium its extra small itsextra medium weight there's no extramedium well there ought to be medium hasbeen left out of the game far too longanyway or we can use thugs like SaintBernard to Chihuahuaeverybody can can kind of put somethingaround there I'm fine I'm in a safetynerd a Labrador and a chihuahua largemedium small and then there aregradients in between by which I cancompare things so that's why we moveaway from trying to be precise but Jessestory points are precise yes it causesproblems I've talked about that in thebig three video it causes problemsbecause we expect one-to-one correlationso whenever we use numbers right if Isay something is one I expect that tomean one of something one hour one dayone week whatever one whatever if it is2 it is 2 of something 2 days 2 hours 2weeks 3 days whatever so points there'sa desire to make it mean something soyou have to go into relativelyestimating right if a point means threethings size complexityI mean flexing effort and out then rightit's not a one two anythingand it's hard for teams to abstract thatso then you go into alright well we cando ten points but we figure out thoseten points by masking those pointnumbers behind something else so if Ihave an extra large that's eight orthat's thirteen and if I have a smallthat's my whoa I have an extra smallthat's one so extra small is onesmallest to medium is three largest fiveextra large is eight right and for ateam that's about good right and thenyou just map things out this story'sabout the same size as that this story'sabout the same size as that and thenthere are averages I mean you can go outon the scrum align so you can lookthey're decades not that case but neardecades of research at this point aboutwhat those values are what do pointsactually equal in hours etc if youreally want that data I so we say thatthe team has ten points so now they gointo their planning for the ten pointsremember a pair of they're taking thetop layer that product owner has pulledthat very top layer of stories that weredecomposed from those features that weredecomposed from those epochs that weretaken from those strategic initiativesinto this room and they say I think itshould be done in this order and I thinkwe can do these five to eight storiesmaybe and the team then has thatconversation they place them in priorityand by the end when they're done they doa vote of confidence on it now I'm goingto introduce some self facilitation herethis is a really cool technique it'scalled the fist of five right this iszero one two three four and fivenow each have their meaning as ifanybody throws a zero it means they're acomplete nutter block on the subjectthey want nothing to do with it they'reprobably going to walk out of the roomone means they feel there are drasticproblems with the situation and unlessthese things are taken intoconsideration they're not going tochange their opinion of the matter atall a two means I hey I understand thevalues that you're trying to receivehere but I have some reservations aroundit three is and this is the mean levelthat we're after of agreement out of anyorganization is I believe in and supportthe the effort and I believe in and cansupport the effort that's itand there's four four is hey you know Imust I'm a strong believer in this and Iwill get my everything to it and thenthere's fiveI am a champion of this cause I believein it and I will help try and convincethose of you convincing that this is thebest course of course forward so at theend of the Sprint the scrum master saysall right let's get our go intoconfidence everybody fists two fiveeverybody throws up their hand you don'twant to rush this right everybody throwsup their hand and you want to do thiscoordinated every time never get lacs onthis like the Marine Corps taught meconfident cocky lazy dead you startplaying around with your fists two fiveyou're ruining your real base levelagreement because if somebody's throwinga five before anybody else they've justsubtly influenced the direction of thephone always one two three and everybodyfriends their values right so at the endyou know at the end of planning whenthey've done all the tasking out weunderstand that the capacity is there todeliver on these on the velocity that webelieve we can commit to then and it'sall structured the right way possibleeverybody's considered all the risks thedependencies have been addressed rightthey know if they need anything fromother teams we're going to communicatethose to the other teams that shouldn'tneed it from anybody else it's alwaysvery risky all right they go to the fistof five and then one two three from anup goes the hands now normal order ofcount people start with the fives let'slook at how many people love the ideaknow when you do that you're furtherdisenfranchising the guy who's probablysitting or the person who's sittingthere with the one the woman the man theindividual who's throwing the one rightthat voice of protest is alwaysrelegated to the last voice it shouldnot be it should be the first voicebecause it contextualizes the concernsimmediately without being amelioratedthrough somebody else's lens of positiveview again your note one you're notwanting to influence you're wanting tobe objective so the most objective startis to that person who's got thestrongest voice against or in oppositionto what you're trying to do right youdon't want yes say or as you want thatperson who's going wait a minute checkyourself that's not rightso you start with the one and the onesays here is my grave concerns and thenthose people who have voice about howthat might be addressed and speak to itand they can have a very clear debatebeing facilitated by that scrum masterand either resolve it or that one movespeople ahead of fours into threes andfives into threes or whatever the casemight be but that's what it's there forus to ensure that everybody has theirvoice heard andall concerns final concerns areaddressed by the end everybody should bea three or above that's final commitmentto the spring when you have thatcommitment in place you're good to gonow what's happening here is feedingpredictability of delivery here this isthe constant set of value that's goingon here they are purely trusting thatthis level is delivering gasoline tothis engine the right gasoline always sothat means this backlog is in a constantstate of refinement to ensure that theright things are at top and they've beenright sized as best as possiblebeforehand to ensure that thisconsistent delivery of a value tenpoints is happening every two weeks andif we think about it this week this wayif I have 10 teams right doing 10 pointsevery two weeks that's 40 points everytwo weeks all rightthat's eight points a month that's 360points every three months 360 points isgoing to equate to a certain number offeatures up here that is their capacityor their throughput or their velocity sonow that 360 points means what well justlike here at the story level where wedon't try and do a one-to-one equationWow the aggregate value of the storypoints associated to a feature that'scoming out of delivery might be onaverage X you do not assume that valuein estimating for planning purposes soyou're going to use t-shirt sizes oranother Fibonacci point sequencing andyou're going to decompose that 360 intoa different value up here because that'sthe componentized measure of featuredelivery so let's just say that onaverage features turn out to be 36points because this makes my math easyand if I divide that by 10 now I knowand I kind of justthat's easier I've got what Oh 36features a month or no it's sorry okayI'm sorry it's wrong I did it the wrongway I'm backwards all right it's Tedright it's 36 points per feature onaverage I've got ten that I can deliverso that's my velocity there ten so whatare the right 10 features that I'm goingto deliver right those 10 features aregoing to equal a whole bunch of storiesfor these teams to deliver against andit could be in one direction or theother right and that's where the sizingstarts to come in so if this level we'restarting talking about so a task doesn'textend past a day a story two to threedays remember right so here shouldn't gopast one to three months so if I'm doingten featuresI've got features that are small andI've got features that are large so thatten can be consumed that again if Irequire it here for a refinementperson's purposes I'm gonna require ithere for refinement purposes I want onetwo three I want those smaller regularlysized things because they're easier toplan around okay the more I get todecompose something into a consistentsize the easier it is to plan around howyou're how how you're delivering againstright the measurement is far easier themoment I throw something in here let'ssay I do take a feature that is actuallyeight of the ten total points what'sbeing developed only one real feature isbeing developed in this period of timeall effort is being consumed by that onething that's risky very very riskyare you sure that value is worth it isthe risk worth it so now let me starttalking about that prioritization ofwork all right so this is where wereally start talking about value this iswhat are we trying to deliver what isthat value and what is the risk to thatdelivery and and safe they've got athing called with shift weight assuresjob first it's a way of looking at allthe what the the core critical elementsofof the work that you're trying to liverright risk-return what you know what'sthe expected outcome all sorts ofdifferent things you know what's thetechnical risk how hard is it to do alot of different ways everybody wants todo it military's got its own withassigning risk and value to things anddoing a quick analysis on a point baseof what's more valuable over the otherthing as a way to proceed the mostrudiment level is risk versus rewardit all starts there right is what I'mdoing worth what I'm supposed to bereceiving and if I'm regularly takinghigh risks for a little reward in otherwords I'm doing a high-wire act and nota lot of people really like to watchhigh wire acts because somebody's gonnafall and the first gust of wind thatcomes along you're at risk anyway sowhat you want to do is you want to beconsistent in your delivery right sothat you understand how you're affectingyour market how well you're being ableto strategically place these values atthe times that you know are going to dothe best so that's what we do here theyhave that commitment now there are agroup of teams I said 10 teams so I'mgonna go ahead and put that times 10 inthere and in every organization what isit Dunbar's numberI forget the number that would fall toan agile they've they've come up withthe average number of people it takes towork on what is called an agile releasedream or a program or a collective groupof teams all delivering against a pointof value for the organization right onecohesive piece of value right acollective piece of value again we'rereducing dependencies if I don't wantteams depending on each other I don'twant these feature value deliveriesdepending on other organizationsdelivering theirs and if they are I'vegot to be highly coordinating them I'vegot to be transparent in those risksthose dependencies that we have so 10teamsI've got producing right those 10 teamsdon't care they're trusting that productowner in this product group to bring theright priorities all the time all theypush back against this bad fuela bad sequence right the engine can't goand reverse it's got to go first secondthird fourth and fifth and then fourththird second first then it go intoreverse or go reverse and then stop fora secondetc right but you can't you can't jumparound in that sequenceso that's all they care about their amachine they trust that the rightpriority is put in place this is why Isaid when I'm asked where do I alwaysstart it's there this might getpredictability at the team level I'vejust fixed the level that's above itthey're producing good fuel now and if Ican fix that layer to produce good fueldown there guess what I'm just donebecause now they're becoming predictableand so on if I have to balance a pyramidI've got to put my finger on the tipfirst understand how best to balance itI don't understand that people who thinkthat you know but to firm it down that'sgonna be that's gonna be it's it's gonnabe finethat way and the moment it loses balanceyou're screwed because you don't haveenough strength you just gonna push thatright out of the way so you start withpredictability it always starts withpredictability so anyway this is why mymy second stay go up getting someinteresting light conflicts now anywayso that's the Sprint medal we come uphere this is that capacity right nowmaybe tens wrong let's call it 36 let'sflip that around they can deliver 36features the average feature totaling 10points so they're eight size eight notgreatmaybe that's an indicator that there'ssome work that needs to be done withthis organization right so this is thisis another way that you start measuringhow things are progressing how are whatis that sighs what are they consumingbecause if all the stories are big orall the features are big you wantsmaller smaller smaller smaller 32 bytes32 32 q your food 32 times 32 times allright so here we're planning on a one tothree month horizon let's call it thethree month it's always better here togo that little further out planning it'sthree months because one month startsto two-week cycles down here and that'shard that's high revs it's like riding amountain bike uphill right you reallylow to speak a lot of effort you're notgetting far fast because the measurementis insane it's just it's too too short acycle put it out three months you wantthat three months it's breathing room inthere it gives real steering all rightand that's the piece that I was reallywas talking about because if I havethese offense occurring on a regularbasis guess what happens when thatceremony occurs when I'm here anyfeedback that pushes this priority setup goes up and in and they're listeningevery two weeks now halfway throughtheir cycle they're gonna go into theirplanning phase but they've been steeringtheir planning has been steered by thefeedback coming from here now that's theother thing I wanted to talk about isthat the intake and delivery cycles isthat there's feedback happening all overthe placethis is how it works all right at thehighest level of vision they'relistening and responding to what theysense the future trends are and how bestto capture those and what big problem itis they're out to solve so that's whatthey're they're pushing for righthowever that has to be informed it hasto be informed regularly that the waythey're thinking is accurate not justfrom external measurements butinternally what it's being heard at thevarious levels because the point ofcommunication every level is differentwith what's going on with whatever it isyou're trying to deliver the people whowork daily have a very differentexperience around that product than theperson who's visioning its future andthey know quite well its capabilities sothey're feeding back about what isprobable and practical right the peoplewho are working at this layer same thingthey're getting that feedback but thenthey're also getting a different levelof feedback because this is thesprinkler this is where the the storiesare being delivered to these featuresthat are going to the market thatproduct owner is hearing what'shappening in the market part of theirjob is to research the efficacy ofwhat's being delivered and what theythink isto be delivered and small consumablebite-sized sources they're payingattention to competition and markettrends so there's constant feedbackgoing on there they're getting informedof what's technically practical everydaythey're listening to what the market isasking for and they're telling everybodythat period the thing that they'rethinking about for that feature ispractical or not and the person who mayown that feature is paying attention tonot only what's being said about itsstrategic value internally what theirresearch is proven they're payingattention to how well this deliveryorganization is putting into the marketthe values that they've delivered andhow they're measuring that back toensure that what they think is right isright such things like NPS rightcustomer satisfaction future value offuture adoption you know did you did youget new market did you bring new peopleinto to buy your product whatever thecase might be those are the measurementsthat they're paying attention to andthey're bringing they're using that toinfluence their own course but all thewhile they're listening to what'shappening here too so that's it's it'sit's it's dynamic and but in nature it'sopposition right we're all trying to dothe same thing everybody's got their ownviewpoint so that diversity isconstantly being resonated that we'remaking sure we're bringing the rightsolution to bear at the right time sohere this is called big group planningbecause now we're starting to coordinatethese 10 different teams around a themeof delivery or a set of themes three bigthings that we're trying to do right sothere's gonna be free big themes ofdelivery coming out of this strategicroadmap that are being broken into thesefeature sets for delivery in the nextone to three months and you want tobring all these teams together and theseteams collectively are like individualson the team and the sprint planning sonow in this big room or whatever you'redoing the product comes in and they'resaying for planning here's where we'regoing right just like the product that Isaid hey here's the top priority storiesand here's why we're doing those storiesthey come in and say these are thefeature sets we're delivering becausethis is what we believe are going toaffect I following these strategicinitiatives and this is why we've put itthis in the priority all these teams andall the people who've been doing theresearcher reviewing and coordinatingand know who the truereality of the environment to deliveragainst the expected outcome at thatlevel have a voice to say you've got arisk that our dependencies can't be donethe technology doesn't exist this iseasy hell yeah let's get God whateverthe case might be and over the course ofthe next two days they go through arobust series of exercises where theysay this is what we're going do businesscomes out and says this is what we'regoing to be doing and why then the techleader comes out and says these are thedirections we've chosen to go in and theproduct leader comes out and says thisis what it's going to look built on topof this technology and what do you guysthink and then the teams start toexpress their concerns did you thinkabout this did you think about that howabout this how about that they collectall those risks they collect all thoseconcerns and the people who are thedecision-makers at this level right thevoices of the product and the businessget together they go hmmm we shouldchange or we shouldn't change if we'renot changing fantastic not team's goodto go all of these concerns were awareof here's how we've addressed them areyou all happy everybody's happygo plan and they go out and they dotheir sprint planning for the very nextsprint of that and they plan a littlebit for the next couple of Sprint's justa little bit seeding the future if we dothese things this is the next logicalprogression to which we're gonna have togo we and understand that this valueties back into the strategies that'soutlined at the beginning of thisplanning session we're comfortable withthis but it's first sprint you'replanning you know 80% of total velocitynext sprint you're probably around 30%some big stories that you might want todecompose third one about 10% just theleading indicator but it's gonna shiftbecause of the feedback cycles every daythat's going back into sprint planningthat's going back up into deliveryplanning that's going back up and toroadmap planning that's going back upinto visionary planning so this is thosesteering points every one of theseplanning ceremonies is a steering pointfor the next ceremony above it it'spretty elegant so that we're constantlybalancing this to be going in the rightdirection that we want to go with theright initiatives taking advantage ofthe market trends I'm starting to getSun coming in from the sidenot much better but a little bit betterand we all know that I'll I'll littereight on I mean the lighting was muchbetter this time than the last time Idid the whiteboard session so anyway sothere there's all these differentfeedbacks that are going on and if we ifwe illustrate it properly it's a seriesof from the task level out right comesin and it goes out into the story levelright and it comes up in the story leveland the feature level goes up into theepic level and the epic level goes up inall the while we're delivering down fromthe initial concept right we'redelivering back down into each one ofthese other layers to actually get theconcept out so the feedback isconstantly coming in the steering isconstantly keeping us balanced and we'reconstantly delivering the right thing atthe right time it's really reallyelegant because this is how it works innature this is really how the processworks this is how it works this isplanning this is how planning works sofrom this level we go up to here nowthere's a whole different set ofmeasurements yes even organizationalalignment video I talked about how thefurther in view in time you go that youplan for the the the less metrics thatyou have that you actually care aboutthe shower that's about your deliveryorganization you have far greatermetrics about did you deliver the valueright or are you researching the rightthings so the metrics at the higherlevel are there is a lot around moreesoteric values right measuring actualvalue delivery against vision all rightsame thing hereyou're still doing that but this isdelivering actual value right this epicis a collection of features so if I wantmy car to have you know the latest insurround sound and it needs to have youknow internet capability so I can streammy music off of off of my Google Playand it's got to have autonomous uhdriving capabilities and it's got tohave sound activation and it's got tohave a complete biometric securitysystem those is a series of featuresthat equal the ethic of delivering aluxury brand vehicle say all right so Ican clearly measure the value of theseat warmer I can clearly measure thevalue of the voice control system I canclearly measure the value of theautonomous driving system those areclear measurements of delivered valuebut up here is that luxury vehicle valueyou know successful in the market nowwhile a driver may enjoy the sound andthe supple luxury of his seats andheated keister the styling of the car isnot so good in the performances and sogreat in its fuel consumption is a pieceof crap so the hit and miss we'remeasuring a lot of different thingsabout what people appreciate in the waywe've solved their problems so planninghere is influenced when it's in themiddle of this again so every fourquarters once a year probably right youwant to take a look and say are we onthe right path do we need to change anystrategic initiatives and how are wedoing this and if I start talking aboutthe harvest cycle and the dormant cyclethat's some esoteric theoretical stuffI've been getting into about how you canorganize your your your delivery cyclesjust like nature and take advantage ofall those values each season hats foryou it's pretty cool ask me for itI do take requests remember I'm doingthese videos upon request from twosubscribersJason and Erin I really appreciate itand don't forget to ask questions if youhave any on the comments section be morethan glad to answer this but again it'sit's no different right we're justtaking the concepts that were given tous from before the feedback that's beengiven to us from below the understandingand feedback we're getting from outsideas well and balance it all to make surethat we're giving the right thing to theright time at the right time to thepeople who are delivering the value downto the market that's it that's that'splanning so that steering point comesnaturally out of the ceremonialcheck-insfor the planning at the lower levels toensure that the right things are beingdone at the right time and that's thatdecentralized decision-making occurringas well because decisions are being madebased on the feedback at every level inwhat direction to go into and if we tieback to that beyond budgeting that'scoming out of Europe and lean budgetingwhere we're pushing funding down intothe actual delivery level and then westart to understand that these guys canbe freed up to do far moreconceptualization really focus in andhunker down on those things that theyknow best how to pay attention to toensure that the right things are beingdelivered down here and trust these guysI'm their research to spend the moneywisely delivering the right featurevalue for that grand vision that we allhave that is agile planning with abalanced agile planning intake anddelivery cycle right so we're in takingall the time but we're always checkingin planning cycles to make sure thatright and the steering point is wherewe're being checked halfway through thedelivery or halfway through before thenext planning to make sure that theplans we've already put in place werethe right ones and adjust those that wehave going forward now the only otherthing that I did not talk about is uphere the other thing that we want tostart thinking about when we talk aboutplanning and as you get mature isrefining your delivery budget because itis a budget if I've got 36 points tospend here and 10 points to spend hereand X number of points to spend here ami spending those points the right theright way so I can have a big bucket uphere now check it out there are fivebasic things that all delivery happensright we're all trying to deliver thesefive things against whatever product itis and I need some water again thesefive things these five things areinnovating building growing maintainingand paying down debt now let mecontextualize these innovation andinnovation at this level is is farreaching its thinking it's it's it'ssaying all right if we're going towardsautonomous vehicles and we're goingtowards AI you know what personalpersonal vehicle ownership is dead howdo I now build the fleet of the futureto ensure that the infrastructure ofpublic transportation is taken care ofthrough AI and autonomous vehicles andwhat about electric so that they'rerecharging through induction chargingroad systems three big visions rightthere rightso that's innovative thinking right howdo we build against that well we're notbuilding against that just yet becauseit's pretty far-reaching but I can startdoing research around the technologiesthat are necessary and where are we atin those and that's what we start totrack at this level for innovative workall rightinnovative work here is along the samelines but this is far closer they'redoing R&D there are significant testsand trials that are being conducted toverify the value of you know prototypesare being financed and understood rightand down in here what is innovativewell it's they're doing the researchthey're doing that you know what is thenext thing what are what architecture dowe need or building that architect wellthat's builds so I'll come to that butinnovation at each level is always aboutthe research that's going on in order tobest do that thing or the what is thenext thing coming right so technologyfocused really down here is what is thetechnologies I need to do these thingsthat you're asking me to do and up herethese are the things that we're actuallytrying to deliver the value sets ofdelivery that we're focusing on oh boyso innovate it's all the research is allthe forward-thinking things researchdevelopment experimentation spikes etcand you have build what is built buildis continuing to build on what you havealready continuing to flesh out existingstrategies that you've completed in thepast right so any epic set of delirialike that luxury vehicle let's say it'sa really good luxury vehicle we expectthat LaSalle to last at least for fivemore years in production what's thatnext what do we do because we're notgoing to innovate on LaSalle we're gonnabuild it out so what feature are wegoing to enhance what's the next levelmore safetyor whatever right so bill this iscontinuing to build upon what youalready have the next one is and that'sat all levels right how do we you knowour current vision the thing that we'veaccomplished how do we continue tomaintain that how do we continue to addto it does it still have value do weneed to a trust and so on and so onright so and down here all they'relooking at is the story and that storyhas been tagged this build grow maintainbecause this is where you're actuallyaccounting on your spends up here iswhere you're you know you've got budgetsand estimates and plans and when youthink you're spending on down here istelling you exactly what it's beingspent on and the goal is that it's asrefined as possible so that you'redelivering the right thing at the righttime from each one of these categoriesremember this is advanced planning sogrow what does grow grow is grow your isis growing the product right what otherfeatures enhancements that may not betied to oh no sorry that's grown buildsthe architecture sorry got it confusedbuild is building the architecturebuilding is doing the technical thingsnot the technical debt but the positivetechnical expense of building thatarchitecture that doing the right thingstechnologically you're building out yourtechnical base to continue to deliveragainst innovation innovation growthmaintenance and making maintenanceeasier actually and reducing your debtso and then the grow is what I wastalking about finishing out thosefeature sets fulfilling the full promiseof that solution that you've deliveredto the market maintained is maintainingwhat you have ensuring that no moredefects go out keeping it steady stateright that which is performing remainsperformant and then lastly is payingdown any debt and then based on howyou're currently set in delivering andwhat percentage is your at and what thequality is of your delivery then you canchoose how you're spending this at anygiven level to ensure that the right setof behaviors are taking place to ensurethat the right things being delivered atthe right time notice that agileplanning always comes back to are wedelivering the right thing at the righttime if I'm balancing this on the tip ofmy finger I'm constantly responsive tothe environmentand I'm making sure I never drop theball all rightthat's part two of agile planning I wantto thank you guys for the request pleasecome at me with more requests and yeahthat completes the session

In this second segment on Agile Planning I talk about the process, ceremonies, and behaviors that go into agile planning at each layer of the Onion

$23.20

Agile Software Development with Scrum (Series in Agile Software Development)

From Amazon

Sales Rank 50542 Schwaber, Ken/ Beedle, Mike

eXtreme Programming is an ideal many software shops would love…
Buy now

Related posts

One Thought to “Agile Planning Pt 2 – Eating the Onion from the Inside Out”

  1. Jesse Pearlman

    Okay – couple of notes post production.

    1. My math is wrong, yes, 10*10 = 100, 100 * 6 = 600 story points delivered and so 60 feature poitns but that’s not the important bit, now is it?

    2. At the end of Delivery planning those people contributing to that delivery also do a vote of confidence in order to commit to the body of work. They use a fist of five as well. At layers above the state mapping will outline how it gets approved.

    3. I take requests

Leave a Comment